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24 Feb 2020
  • Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute
  • Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre
  • Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity
1-2pm

Monday Lunch Live Special - Gamma Delta T cells: New immunological troops to help fight cancer

VCCC-affiliated researchers have deciphered a new way that immune cells detect infections and cancers.

Join us to hear Professor Jonathan Cebon and Dr Andreas Behren of Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute together with Dr Adam Uldrich and Professor Dale Godfrey from the Doherty Institute explain the findings and significance of recently published research into Gamma Delta T cells at a special Monday Lunch Live presentation.

Join us to hear Professor Jonathan Cebon and Dr Andreas Behren of Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute together with Dr Adam Uldrich and Professor Dale Godfrey from the Doherty Institute explain the findings and significance of recently published research into Gamma Delta T cells at a special Monday Lunch Live presentation.

The immune system is incredibly complex with many different types of cells and many different molecules that regulate immune responses. One important cell type, known as gamma delta T cells, is thought to play a key role in cancer immunity but the mechanisms underlying their response to cancer are unclear. This collaborative team have uncovered a new molecular target for gamma delta T cells known as Butyrophilin 2A1.  This molecule is present on multiple cancer types and is directly recognised by gamma delta T cells. As published in Science Magazine, these findings highlight a new type of therapeutic target that should engage the potent anti-tumour activity that gamma delta T cells are known to possess.

This research is also an exciting finding for the wider scientific community as it is hoped that it will ultimately lead to new and improved immunotherapy treatments people impacted by cancer and infection.

This presentation will be of interest to researchers, clinicians and anyone interested in how immunotherapy can be improved by recruiting specialised killer cell types from the immune system.

More information: https://www.onjcancercentre.org/news/article/2020/01/09/researchers-discover-a-new-way-that-immune-cells-detect-cancers-and-infections

Professor Jonathan Cebon

Immediate past Medical Director of both Cancer Services at the Olivia Newton John Cancer Wellness and Research Centre (ONJCWRC) at Austin Health and the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute (ONJCRI) and Professor of Medicine at the University of Melbourne and the School of Cancer Medicine.

Professor Cebon established the Melanoma service at Austin Health and heads the Cancer Immunobiology Program at ONJCRI.  As a clinician scientist, his research career has focused on understanding the interface between immunology and cancer biology, with a focus on melanoma.  This has led to discoveries that have informed our understanding of melanoma cell biology, antigen expression, immune recognition, immune control, therapeutics and immune evasion.

Dr Andreas Behren
Tumour Immunology Laboratory Head, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute

Dr Andreas Behren is a PhD graduate from the Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen (Germany) and a fellow from the German Research Foundation. Dr Behren was recruited in 2008 to the Ludwig Institute of Cancer Research in Melbourne (LICR), Australia, to pursue his interest in tumour heterogeneity. Dr Behren was appointed a group leader in 2014 at the LICR and subsequently at the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute (ONJCRI). In 2017 he was awarded a Victorian Cancer Agency Mid-Career Research Fellowship and was appointed Head of the Tumour Immunology Laboratory (TIL) in 2018. Dr Behren has established a research program to decipher the details of tumour-immune engagement with a strong clinical trial and industry-supported research component. His research has been widely published in highly influential journals including Cancer Research, Nature, Nature Communications and recently in Science

Professor Dale Godfrey
Laboratory Head, Immunology Theme Leader, Doherty Institute

Professor Dale Godfrey has spent 30 years researching cell types in the immune system, broadly known as unconventional T cells, that are less well understood but have clear immunotherapeutic potential. Godfrey is an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellow. He is a past President of the Australasian Society for Immunology (ASI), Founding President of the Melbourne Immunotherapy Network (MIN).

Dr Adam Uldrich
Senior Research Fellow, University of Melbourne/ Doherty Institute

Dr Adam Uldrich completed his PhD at Monash University and subsequently held an NHMRC fellowship at PeterMac, prior to joining The University of Melbourne as an ARC Future Fellow. Dr Uldrich’s research is focussed on understanding how a specialized subset of T cells, called gamma-delta T cells, combat infections and cancer.

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